Real Kids Real Faith is reimagining how children’s spirituality looks, sounds, and acts in this moment.

Our Vision

Growing up human today means facing big challenges and high expectations. So we’re rethinking how to help children respond creatively to whatever life brings their way.

Children’s spiritual lives don’t come prepackaged, but are stitched together by snuggles on the sofa, tears over a lost lovey, and gaming with friends next door. Their spirituality is also shaped by a parent’s job loss, learning challenges, and allergies that mean nobody else can have peanut butter.

The good, the bad, the really hard – it affects a child’s spirit. And we’ll address it all.

The ideas you’ll find here are research-based, motivated by a desire to see kids flourish in significant ways. This is important work, best done together. We’re glad you’ve joined us.

About Us Subscribe

Practicing Gratitude

Gratitude may seem like a natural attitude, but studies show it is primarily a skill that children learn from others.

More
  • Pathways to Wonder & Awe

    The first time I saw flying fish, I was overcome with amazement. They looked like silvery stars twinkling in the waves as they leap away from a boat wake.

    More
    How Music Helps Kids Connect with Others

    We are a music-loving family. All three children eagerly participated in recorder lessons in elementary school and one wrote her own recorder music.

    More
  • Learning about Self & Others with The Garfield Movie

    We often wonder what pets are thinking and feeling, especially when they do something that seems odd or silly.

    More
    Imagining Wellbeing with IF

    Studies show that around 65% of children develop imaginary friends (IFs) before they are seven. These sometimes quite colorful characters provide kids with companionship and support.

    More
  • Meaningful End-of-Year Recognition

    Awards ceremonies are often a major event at the end of a program year. Some children eagerly await them,

    More
    Helping Kids Feel Important

    “You never listen to me!” complained my nine-year-old. She was trying to tell me about the antics of some of the boys in her Spanish class while I was trying to start a load of laundry and clean up the kitchen.

    More